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About this Site




Improving sports performance and preventing back pain through the use of exercise ball exercises  works because it is based on sound  anatomical and physiological principles. Although medical professionals have always known that  spinal problems often arise from weaknesses, simply addressing these weaknesses by using "strengthening exercises" is like telling someone with an illness to "take a lot of medications" without using the specific medication for the specific illness.  It makes sense to target the muscles that stabilize your spine when preventing back pain.  If you are dealing with a specific back condition now, you should consult a physical therapist to determine which exercises are best to target your problem.

I graduated from the University of Toronto with a bachelor of science in human physiology and physics in 1988. Taking my interest in physics and physiology to the University of Toronto's  faculty of medicine, I went on to complete my degree in physical therapy in 1992. I got my credentials in mechanical diagnosis and treatment of the spine in 1999 through the McKenzie Institute International, one of only 55 in Canada at the time. I received my certificate in acupuncture from the Acupuncture Foundation of Canada Institute in 1997. Postgraduate studies have included extensive work in manual therapy, proprioceptive and kinesio taping, craniomandibular disorders, M.E.T. (medical exercise therapy) and the treatment of golf related injuries. I received my post-professional doctorate in musculoskeletal management from EIM Institute of Health Professions.

A highlight in my career was being voted "Best Physiotherapist" by readers of the local News Advertiser, an affirmation that I was providing a good service. I've of course been a member of the Canadian Physiotherapy association since 1992, belonging to the orthopaedic, sports physiotherapy and private practice divisions. My primary area of clinical interest lies in orthopaedic conditions, sports injuries, and motor vehicle accident injuries.

I've had the good fortune of working with athletes, both competitive and recreational in hockey, soccer, swimming, rugby, baseball, rowers, triathletes, skiers, snowboarders, and runners. I have a special interest in skiing, snow boarding, weight training, golfing, and swimming. My current participation in sports includes playing golf, skiing, snowboarding, scuba diving, and weight training.

I currently own a practice just east of Toronto where I've noticed growing interest in home fitness and gyms. Most patients tell me they have an exercise ball at home, either still in the box or being used by the kids because no one knows what to do with it besides crunches. I'm frequently approached by patients looking for a good source of exercise ball exercises. Given the extensive use of exercise balls in rehabilitation, who better to put together a site on exercise ball exercises than a Physical Therapist!

If you find my website helpful please keep visiting. Feel free to add your own exercises and add your favourite exercise ball videos.

Thanks,

Janice Eveleigh PT  BSc,BScPT,DPT,MCPA,CredMDT,CAFCI